Author Topic: Entering the dream from WILD  (Read 1312 times)

Offline Relyt

  • Analyzer
  • ***
  • Posts: 227
  • Just the Grin
Entering the dream from WILD
« on: August 03, 2012, 06:45:57 PM »
So last night I almost WILDed sucessfully,
So, here's what happened. The first time the wormhole sensations stopped, I had entered a dream without realizing it. I know this now because the only reason I could take my dad's bed was because he went to work. Also because there is no way my grandpa had come back from the dead, nor could my dad get to wherever he was so quickly after being in the room with me.
Does anybody have any tips about entering the dream after dream paralysis? Is it sort of a crap shoot of when your "wormhole" sensations stop? Any insight would be....insightful.  8)
-Oh, no, no. I was just wondering if you could help me find my way.
          -Well that depends on where you want to get to.
-Oh, it really doesn't matter, as long as...
          -Then it really doesn't matter which way you go.
                                                                                Lewis Carroll

Offline iadr

  • Evaluator
  • *****
  • Posts: 9160
  • Peace Be With You!
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2012, 08:34:54 PM »
So last night I almost WILDed sucessfully,
So, here's what happened. The first time the wormhole sensations stopped, I had entered a dream without realizing it. I know this now because the only reason I could take my dad's bed was because he went to work. Also because there is no way my grandpa had come back from the dead, nor could my dad get to wherever he was so quickly after being in the room with me.
Does anybody have any tips about entering the dream after dream paralysis?
Sure, just use your imagination to start creating some passive scenes that you feel yourself in the middle of, and see if they can turn into a dream. By passive we mean to let the scenes form naturally without putting too much mental effort into them.
Beg and Bas: HA GG TR LM CL SO LC RS FL LW TD
Int: EF BI JR DC WH CT CW IA WA TA WT JT RA WW WF RA MF WF BO TK
Advanced: TT AN OB CS BH ST
Sea:
All tasks completed. Going through a second time.

Offline pj

  • Learning.
  • Technical Guild
  • Evaluator
  • *****
  • Posts: 14179
  • We are made of such stuff as dreams are made of.
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2012, 08:48:01 PM »
I've always found it tricky.  I have to sort of deliberately let go of consciousness while remaining intent on remembering that I will emerge in a dream.  It is like holding on to just the finest thread of consciousness without letting it break.
What truly matters is not built of right and wrong; but of grace, and of love.

--pj

Offline Snaggle

  • Synthesizer
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2012, 11:37:38 PM »
So last night I almost WILDed sucessfully,
So, here's what happened. The first time the wormhole sensations stopped, I had entered a dream without realizing it. I know this now because the only reason I could take my dad's bed was because he went to work. Also because there is no way my grandpa had come back from the dead, nor could my dad get to wherever he was so quickly after being in the room with me.
Does anybody have any tips about entering the dream after dream paralysis? Is it sort of a crap shoot of when your "wormhole" sensations stop? Any insight would be....insightful.  8)

Firstly I think you need to abandon a false idea. One does not go from being awake to sleep paralysis to lucid dreaming. A direct WILD follows the normal sleep pattern almost exactly. What is the normal pattern? Stage 0. being awake; stage 2. losing consciousness; stage 3. hypnagogic images; stage 4; NREM dreams; stage 5. dreamless delta sleep; stage 6 rem muscle atonia (AKA sleep paralysis); stage 7 REM dreams.

 A  normal direct entry WILD has a pattern like this: stage0. being awake; stage one hypnagogic images; stage 2 NREM dreams; stage 3. muscle atonia; stage 4. Rem dreams; stage 5. REM nightmares; 6. exit dreams (these are the normal dreams that one wakes up in dreaming, they by their quality are mainly NREM dreams). Note: rem muscle atonia is normally experienced only as a quick dream image rather than as an SP experience

To do a direct entry WILD one just needs to relax ones body and let it fall asleep, while keeping ones brain alert. With less complete/complex WILDs such as WBTB/dream returns it's usually enough just to again relax ones body and think of the exit dream one was having, but most of these types of WILDs just take one back to NREM dreams. The REM dreams and nightmares one experiences after rem Atonia are more intense and one is much more disassociated with ones real body, which makes it much harder to wake out of them if one is in a very bad lucid nightmare. One might or might not be able to transform a lucid nightmare into a cool experience as one will always have a range of dream control in a lucid dream from none at all to Godlike control. I hope this helped you, good luck with your WILD attempts.

Offline Sunshine

  • Research Guild
  • Evaluator
  • *****
  • Posts: 16143
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2012, 10:44:26 AM »
(content removed by user request)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 07:04:01 PM by pj »

Offline Relyt

  • Analyzer
  • ***
  • Posts: 227
  • Just the Grin
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2012, 02:55:16 PM »
When I say "wormhole sensations" I mean that feeling you get when it feels like you are being pulled through a hurricane. This is after sleep paralysis. So after they are over it means I either woke out of it or transitioned into a dream without knowing it. I believe the "wormhole sensation" is the transition into the dream.
-Oh, no, no. I was just wondering if you could help me find my way.
          -Well that depends on where you want to get to.
-Oh, it really doesn't matter, as long as...
          -Then it really doesn't matter which way you go.
                                                                                Lewis Carroll

Offline Snaggle

  • Synthesizer
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2012, 06:56:23 PM »
Wormholes are an interesting transitional symbol.

Offline johnb

  • Evaluator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2702
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2012, 07:45:17 PM »
« Last Edit: August 07, 2012, 07:51:59 PM by johnb »
In the secret space of dreams
Where I dreaming lay amazed
When the secrets all are told
And the petals all unfold
When there was no dream of mine
You dreamed of me.
-- from Attics of My Life, by Robert Hunter

Offline SmifoPL

  • Sleeper by Nature
  • Applier
  • **
  • Posts: 72
  • Does hard work and practice beat nature and talent
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2013, 07:18:48 PM »
In my opinion REM Nightmares are the best foundation for a great lucid. Most of my DILDs started off as nightmares, usually with someone/something chasing me, and then i tell myself, 'they can't do anyuthing it's my dream' and i make the negative things dissappear, usually the whole dreamscape and make my own dreamscape so i totally forget about the negative. I get more control, lucidity and stability in my dream after a REM Nightmare

Offline johnb

  • Evaluator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2702
Re: Entering the dream from WILD
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2013, 09:00:18 PM »
In my opinion REM Nightmares are the best foundation for a great lucid. Most of my DILDs started off as nightmares, usually with someone/something chasing me, and then i tell myself, 'they can't do anyuthing it's my dream' and i make the negative things dissappear, usually the whole dreamscape and make my own dreamscape so i totally forget about the negative. I get more control, lucidity and stability in my dream after a REM Nightmare

That's how I had my first LD as a child. A bee was chasing me.

Maybe it's a good idea to RC whenever you're in a scary or stressful situation.
In the secret space of dreams
Where I dreaming lay amazed
When the secrets all are told
And the petals all unfold
When there was no dream of mine
You dreamed of me.
-- from Attics of My Life, by Robert Hunter